Protest against the World Cup in Copacabana on June 12, 2014. (Photo from Agência Brasil, a public Brazilian news agency)

What the World Cup loss means to Brazil

Protest against the World Cup in Copacabana on June 12, 2014.  (Photo from Agência Brasil, a public Brazilian news agency)

Protest against the World Cup in Copacabana on June 12, 2014. (Photo from Agência Brasil, a public Brazilian news agency)

After living in Brazil for over a year, I had mixed feelings on the arrival of the World Cup. Those feelings got even more mixed with the country’s devastating loss to Germany July 8th.

On the one hand, hosting the World Cup brought an incredible amount of human suffering. Lawless land evictions and copious amounts of public spending on stadiums sat uneasily with me. But as a visitor from Seattle in a place where the sport of soccer is revered nearly as a religion, it would be elitist to impose my beliefs on something happening to a country that isn’t mine.

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Categories: Featured, Perspectives, Sports

API Flying Bookshelf organizers gather a crowd of about a couple dozen at their July 17 launch party at Eastern Cafe. From left to right, co-curators Minh Nguyen and Chris Woon, and co-founders Sabrina Chen and Derek Dizon. (Photo by Tuyen Than)

API Flying Bookshelf gets its wings, seeks new landing spot

API Flying Bookshelf organizers gather a crowd of about a couple dozen at their July 17 launch party at Eastern Cafe. From left to right, co-curators Minh Nguyen and Chris Woon, and co-founders Sabrina Chen and Derek Dizon. (Photo by Tuyen Than)

API Flying Bookshelf organizers gathered a crowd of a couple dozen people at their July 17 launch party at Eastern Cafe. From left to right, co-curators Minh Nguyen and Chris Woon, and co-founders Sabrina Chen and Derek Dizon. (Photo by Tuyen Than)

Historically, the plight and accomplishments of Asian Pacific Islander Americans (APIAs) have been left out of our U.S. history classes. Even some of the most reprehensible discriminatory policies against APIAs such as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1942 are easily forgotten. And these past grievances still carry over in micro-aggressions that imply we still do not belong here with questions like “Where are you from?”, “What are you?” and  “You look really Asian in this picture.”

The API Flying Bookshelf, a traveling library taking up temporary residence at the Eastern Café in Chinatown-International District through the end of this month, is a community-driven antidote to this.

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Categories: Arts & Culture

Flordeliza Querijero (right) works on a mosaic that will be installed in the lobby of Courtland Place — an affordable housing project for seniors in the Rainier Valley. (Photo by Greg Gilbert / The Seattle Times)

Mosaic brings diverse women together in south Seattle

The rattle of thousands of tiny pieces of glass pouring from buckets and Tupperware was the steady soundtrack in the basement of Courtland Place (a senior housing project in Columbia City) last Tuesday morning. Well, that and the crooning of Barry White.

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Categories: Arts & Culture, Columnists, Featured

Seattle's new Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs Director Cuc Vu (center) flanked by Mayor Ed Murray and outgoing Interim Director Aaliyah Gupta. (Photo by Kamna Shastri)

New boss for city’s Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs

Tuesday morning, Seattle Mayor Edward Murray introduced Cuc Vu as the new acting director of the Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs (OIRA). Vu will be taking the place of Interim Director Aaliyah Gupta.

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Categories: Featured, Immigration, Politics

Buying bread in Gaza. (Photo by Karin Huster)

Last postcard from Gaza

In 2013 I traveled to Gaza to work at Al Shifa, the main hospital. Nothing prepared me for what I experienced crossing the border into Gaza, and then spending time there.

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Categories: Featured, Health, Perspectives, Politics

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